A Meeting of Minds - An Anne McCaffrey Discussion Forum  

Go Back   A Meeting of Minds - An Anne McCaffrey Discussion Forum > The Mezzanine > The Library Café
FAQ Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

The Library Café Come in, relax, and get to know the other members of this site. Share your hobbies and interests, along with general news of your life.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old Aug 27 2019, 09:37 AM   #5041
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

The only clear glass that shows up on x rays is old-fashioned leaded glass, like they used to use in fancy crystal. I know this because I did the same thing as you, once upon a time, a lifetime ago, so "been there, done that", except the doc got all of mine out the first time around.

Sounds to me like your doctors don't know their glass from their elbow.
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 27 2019, 10:09 AM   #5042
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

Lynchburg General didn't want to be bothered. I'm on Medicaid, so they wouldn't make any money from me. They also won't refer me to an Dr. that is not owned by them. There are reasons I usually go to UVA, even tho it is 2 hours away.
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 28 2019, 04:52 AM   #5043
P'ter
Crafter

Craftmaster
 
P'ter's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Wolverhampton
Gender: M
Fan of: Favorite?
Now Reading: avidly
Default Re: What is happening

And this is the health (lack of) care that T'rump wishes to impose on the UK?
__________________
"Truth is stranger than fiction: fiction has to make sense." Leo Rosten.

"When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."
C. S. Lewis

"I find television very educational. Whenever somebody switches it on I go in the other room and read a book." (attributed to Groucho Marx)

The Pedants are revolting! (against bad grammar)
P'ter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 28 2019, 01:56 PM   #5044
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

The joys of U.S health care
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 28 2019, 02:57 PM   #5045
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

If I wasn't on disability I wouldn't have Medicaid, so ortho would not have to see me or would cost a fortune.
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 28 2019, 10:15 PM   #5046
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

I have very, very real worries that given the current trends in our administration that we may well wind up with an increasingly US style system...and with everyone in the household on regular essential medication that's a worry. I've seen what the anti seizure medication my husband is on cost in the US... likewise my inhalers...

-- -- --

Things today started out in a frustrating way.

The throttle cable kit I had been waiting for since the sixth of August finally arrived today. However it immediately became apparent that it did not contain the parts I needed.

What I thought were the small barrel shaped cable ends in the tiny blurry images on the listing actually turned out to be ferrules (left on the image below), and the actual cable ends were the larger type. Shown to the right.



By this point I was thoroughly irked given how long I had waited for it. This quite quickly turned into me refusing to be beaten given that I was holding a new length of decent cable in my hand.

The issue I had was that the barrel type cable ends supplied while correct in their length were roughly twice the required diameter. So they wouldn't fit into the proper retainer in the twist grip. I couldn't even wedge one in behind the holder because the clamshell sections which cover it wouldn't close with the cable end sitting so much prouder than the original.

That was until I gave it some thought and brandished an angle grinder at it. I cut a new slot just to one side of the original cable retainer like so...



Which allows the larger cable end to sit like this...



This drops the height of things to a point where the covers can be correctly reassembled. Having left the original retainer untouched means I will have the option to revert to the other type of cable end in the future if needed.

With the new end soldered onto the cable everything was put together and it worked. Action still isn't great so I may well change the cable outer as well at some point, but it is actually working now. The twist grip itself isn't the nicest thing ever anyway, so that too might be replaced in the future.

Which meant I could finally get the car out of the garage for the first time in several weeks.





Answers on a postcard for the best way to shift overspray from tyres?

Before heading out though I made a point of properly setting the CVT belt tension - spacing the pulley centres 10.25" apart as per the manual (I'll probably find I've remembered the value wrong now) as I was pretty certain the belt was too loose when I was last out. It was very snatchy moving off from a standstill and sounded like it was flapping around a lot at speed.

Still a bit juddery moving off from a standstill, but definitely better. I suspect the engine/gearbox mounts I have are a bit last their best so may look to replace those at some point. It does to some extent seem to be something they are a bit prone to though from what I remember seeing.

Drive is definitely happier though, *far* quieter and especially so at cruising speed. Much less of a noticeable shunt when coming off the power too. Several points while out today I was having to back off the throttle due to the 60mph speed limit rather than due to running out of road or other traffic.

Fuelling up has shown us nearly touching 30mpg on that last tank - half of which was prior to fitting the new pulleys, so it's definitely heading the right way. Not expecting to ever see particularly great figures locally as MK is murderous on fuel economy because of there being a roundabout every 0.9 miles. Would be nice to see over 30mpg though, which hopefully we will on the next tank.

Obviously had to snap a few photos while out and about.

The heavens did open at one point, which revealed that I owe an apology to this windscreen wiper blade.



I had expected it to be nothing but a pointless shiny bit of tat...but it actually works just fine, better than the Bosch one which was on there before anyway.

Even when the surface is horribly rough, you still get water beading on new paint which is always satisfying to see.



At least I now have a few reasonable "stock" images of TPA I can throw at people when they ask what a Model 70 is now. Obviously I'll need to re-take these once the new number plates arrive though.









...And back home after all the excitement of an actual run.



The sliding doors still amuse me and seem to utterly confuse passers by.

I'll need to find an excuse to head out of town shortly so I can properly assess how the drive is behaving. Definitely seems far happier now though and there wasn't anything which felt like it gave me cause for concern during the drive. Never mind nothing actually falling off, it didn't feel like anything was even in danger of falling off this time.

Looking at those photos now it is slightly hard to believe that's the same car that arrived wedged in the back of a Transit van about a year ago...



She's undergone a bit of a transformation I think it's fair to say!
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 29 2019, 01:44 AM   #5047
Dragon Fan
Senior Member
 
Dragon Fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Gender: M
Fan of: The Smallest Dragonboy
Now Reading: Great Expectations
Default Re: What is happening

Working a swing shift schedule is crazy, Don't know for sure when to, Sleep, Work, of maybe I should just sleep at work !
__________________
"To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under heaven"
Dragon Fan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 29 2019, 07:18 AM   #5048
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon Fan View Post
Working a swing shift schedule is crazy, Don't know for sure when to, Sleep, Work, of maybe I should just sleep at work !
Not fun. A friend of mine used to work for one of the major bus operators over here. He left when the local office handed responsibility for allocating driver shifts to the HQ elsewhere in the country.

Usually beforehand things were discussed with the driving staff, and you could usually find people who were happy to do the shifts available - though nobody really liked split shifts they weren't all that common on the roster and volunteers could usually be found.

Overnight that changed and suddenly you could find yourself in the course of a week doing a different shift pattern every day. Earlys one day, lates the next, back to earlys, split shift thrown in just to confuse you further...it was completely random. Allocation was done that was "to ensure fairness to all staff." My mate said that the couple of months before he moved elsewhere very nearly cost him his sanity. It's a long working week to start with, never mind once you have any hope of knowing what day it is, never mind what time it is totally stripped away.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 29 2019, 07:30 PM   #5049
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

Kinda scared about getting the glass out tomorrow. I know it needs to come out, but I also know its going to hurt.
Not sure why I'm so depressed. Hopefully I'll feel better when the glass is out & foot & knees quit hurting so much.
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 29 2019, 08:51 PM   #5050
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Quote:
Originally Posted by mawra View Post
Kinda scared about getting the glass out tomorrow. I know it needs to come out, but I also know its going to hurt.
Not sure why I'm so depressed. Hopefully I'll feel better when the glass is out & foot & knees quit hurting so much.
You'd hope they'd use a local anaesthetic for something like that...Though I imagine it's still far from a pleasant experience. Really hope that it goes smoothly for you though.

-- -- --

I figure that by far the best thing for TPA at the moment is to cover miles given how long she's sat dormant. To this end I took the very long way round both to and from the shops this afternoon, covering roughly another 40 miles.



Nothing I've ever owned does quite such a good job of making conventional parking spaces look absolutely massive.

She didn't miss a beat. The only gremlin I have discovered is that the heater control flaps aren't closing fully in the control box...so the heater doesn't switch off quite fully. The efficacy of the heat exchanger definitely isn't in doubt...The air coming out of the vents is *painfully* hot...so it would be nice to be able to switch it off properly. Especially as the outlet for the main cabin heater is under the seat. Gets a bit toasty after half an hour or so.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 29 2019, 11:08 PM   #5051
SpaceCowboy
Member
Journeyman
 
SpaceCowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana USA
Gender: M
Fan of: "The Ship Who Searched"
Default Re: What is happening

I work nothing but mid shift 11-8, 12-9, or 1-10 at my store with occasional 9-6 or 10-7 shifts. It can be difficult sometimes but I've learned to live with it. However because I'm the only full time cashier that is available all weekend ( Thur-Mon) I'm also the only cashier that works a guaranteed 40 hours a week. The other cashiers hate me for that, but management loves me since they know I will be in when scheduled and I never miss a day. I'm also what our management calls the "stress test trainer". Once the other cashiers get newbies trained they get sent to me for polishing and final training on bagging and how the drawer should look. The customer service managers can tell if I've worked a drawer and if it was by myself. Mainly because I have mine so organized that auditing it takes 30 seconds compared to up to three minutes when auditing someone else.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon Fan View Post
Working a swing shift schedule is crazy, Don't know for sure when to, Sleep, Work, of maybe I should just sleep at work !
SpaceCowboy is nu online   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 30 2019, 08:41 AM   #5052
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

They will use a local
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 30 2019, 12:25 PM   #5053
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

I just (finally) got my chemo port removed yesterday. It was put in following my colon cancer surgery last July. One chemo infusion, and I was done. I was supposed to have an infusion every two weeks for six months. I had lost a lot of weight in the year prior to the surgery, due to the cancer, of course, and had just started to gain some back in the month following the surgery. Then came that FOLFOX chemo. Besides the side effects affecting my sense of taste and sensitivity to cold, I just plain lost over 13 pounds in one week. The other side effects were supposed to only last 3, maybe 4 days at the most. It was about 10 days before they started easing up.

I discontinued the chemo after that first week of misery. I told the oncologist I would come back and talk to him about restarting it, in the spring, after the cold weather was letting up. Well, he basically dropped me when I wouldn't do exactly what he told me, when he told me to do it! I was never told that the chemo port was supposed to be flushed out every 2 months or so.

So fast forward to this year. When everything else FINALLY settled down, I went to a Veteran's Administration (VA) oncologist to talk about the need for chemo again, as a sort of second opinion. A very hardcore, thorough CAT scan and exam later, and Dr. Patton told me that I am still cancer free, and that there is no reason to restart chemo at this time. Yay me.

But she wants to leave the port in for a while yet. Boo.

Then I got a call from my local VA clinic to schedule an appointment to have the port (routinely) flushed. "When was it last flushed?" the nurse asked.
"Flushed?" I replied. After finding that out, Dr. Patton set things in motion to get the irritating thing removed. That brings us to yesterday. Yay again.

After a year plus of that damn thing being a constant source of irritation and discomfort, it's GONE!

There's a little bit of post-op pain, but it's of the "hurts so good" variety.

So good luck with your minor op. procedure Maw. Now that you are on the right track, doctor-wise, I'm sure everything will work out.

By the way, I'm surprised that no one commented on my pun in my post to Mawra, "the doctor doesn't know his glass from his elbow". Guess no one is as much of a punster as I and Spider Robertson. Or else that saying I twisted isn't recognized internationally.
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 30 2019, 07:38 PM   #5054
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

The glass was removed, with no problems. I have a hale the size of my pinky fingernail in the heal of my foot. The numbing stuff is wearing off, so it is now hurting.
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 30 2019, 07:57 PM   #5055
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Glad it sounds like you've had things moving the right way medically speaking Allen and Mawra.

A friend of mine has been going through chemo and radiotherapy for a cancer, so have seen first hand what the treatment can do to people, never mind the disease itself...not something I'd wish on my worst enemy, so glad you've had the all clear.

-- -- --

You know a while ago I gave some of the rusty and/or scruffy metalwork in the engine bay some paint? I really should of either held off doing that until after I painted the rest of the car or masked it off.



Oops.

On the plus side it wasn't exactly a work of art, so not much to be replicated. Have already given the cowling a fresh coat of hammered black.



I'd really like to get the fan off so I can give it a better clean up, but the bolt holding it onto the dynastart really doesn't want to budge. A six foot breaker bar and 3/8" socket extension resulted in zero movement and a bent socket extension. A task for a year or five down the line.

Had a few errands to run today and it would have been rude to take any other car wouldn't it.



Enjoy the fact that it wouldn't take all that much editing to take thirty years off this photo.

Starting to get a bit of a better feel for the car now and can definitely vouch for it being very much at home darting around congested city streets. The only slight negative mark is that the initial launch between 0 and 5mph is a little sluggish. This is down to the centrifugal clutch and a relatively heavy flywheel for a small engine like this. It's not bad, just more like an old school automatic with a long first gear. Just needs a half second or so more forward planning than driving a modern car when you're pulling into a busy roundabout or turning right out of junctions.

Have been a little more daring today and can vouch now for this car having downright tenacious levels of grip compared to what you'd expect. Yes she wanders about in sidewinds a bit and wobbles in a strange way unique to three wheelers on uneven surfaces, but there's a lot more cornering ability than you'd think.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31 2019, 12:41 PM   #5056
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

"I'd really like to get the fan off so I can give it a better clean up, but the bolt holding it onto the dynastart really doesn't want to budge. A six foot breaker bar and 3/8" socket extension resulted in zero movement and a bent socket extension. A task for a year or five down the line."

Zelandeth, I'm going to assume you've checked and this isn't one of those things the manufacturer decided to use backwards threads on, is it? Fans on small engines are infamous for that very thing.

The little buggy has indeed come a long way from when you brought it home. Personally, I've put it into my "so ugly it's cute" category. I've been a fan of the AC brand since discovering that the original Ford Cobra was in fact an AC car that Caroll Shelby worked his magic on. The 427 version of the AC Cobra was the car I said you could steer with your right foot. Another little-known brand (over here) I've held a fascination with is TVR. I think I first discovered the brand in Sony's "Grand Turismo" video game.
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31 2019, 01:00 PM   #5057
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

Oh, a little side note about the "backwards-thread" thing. I'm a Long, long time lover of our Chrysler Corporation vehicles. Cars, anyway. Trucks, not so much. We old gear-heads call them Mopars, which was a name Chrysler itself used for a long time.

Anyway, they used left-hand thread (counter-clockwise, anti-clockwise, or just plain backwards, whatever) on their vehicles left side lugs no later than the 1950s, maybe earlier, up through at least the 1970s. In the 1950s they didn't have studs on the wheel hubs, they used lug bolts instead of a stud and nut. Left side of vehicle, left hand lugs. These were marked with either a letter L or a star. Some day, if you're interested, I'll tell you a little story about my friend, his brother who we called "Kong", and left-hand lugs.
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31 2019, 01:13 PM   #5058
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

TVRs are epic amounts of fun if you know someone who owns one. However they require biblical levels of patience to actually live with as they tend to be exceedingly temperamental and even the simplest maintenance tends to require you to dismantle three quarters of the car. That's once you have figured out how the engineers actually put things together in the first place, as it's very often anything but conventional. Kind of like a classic Jaguar but turned up to eleven...

The pulley nut in this case isn't reverse threaded, it's just a really big but which has had 40+ years to rust in place. Not going to worry about it too much, that's a task for the future. Just don't want to use heat in case I cause damage to the dynastart as it's directly behind the pulley.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31 2019, 04:03 PM   #5059
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

Kibby's boss's boss told Kibby that she & the girl that the girl that was SUPPOSE to close with Thurs did a really good job. Kibby told him the girl left early (just because she wanted to & without really saying anything). Kibby did all the closing cleaning by herself. Boss's boss told her she did an excellent job. Kibby is very proud of herself. It is not the first time the girl has left way early. She left before store even closed, which made a high schooler who is not suppose to work past 9. ( according to parents rules).
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 31 2019, 05:11 PM   #5060
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zelandeth View Post
TVRs are epic amounts of fun if you know someone who owns one. However they require biblical levels of patience to actually live with as they tend to be exceedingly temperamental and even the simplest maintenance tends to require you to dismantle three quarters of the car. That's once you have figured out how the engineers actually put things together in the first place, as it's very often anything but conventional. Kind of like a classic Jaguar but turned up to eleven...

The pulley nut in this case isn't reverse threaded, it's just a really big but which has had 40+ years to rust in place. Not going to worry about it too much, that's a task for the future. Just don't want to use heat in case I cause damage to the dynastart as it's directly behind the pulley.
I've heard most of that about TVRs before. Thanks for the confirmation.... I think!

Good & bad news about the fan nut. If you were on my side of the pond, I'd say get some PB Blaster penetrating fluid, or some Kroil, which dates back to the 1920s (Google it for fun), or its modern equivalent, AeroKroil. But I doubt any of those are easily available in your part of the world.
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 2 2019, 01:05 AM   #5061
SpaceCowboy
Member
Journeyman
 
SpaceCowboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana USA
Gender: M
Fan of: "The Ship Who Searched"
Default Re: What is happening

I got some very wonderful news this afternoon while at work. My oldest niece Miss Kailyn promoted me from Uncle Jeff to Great Uncle Jeff. Mom and baby are doing well and I am over the moon since this is the first boy born in the immediate family since I was born 55 years ago. She named him Cameron Joseph and he was 6 pounds 14 ounces in weight and 21 inches in length at birth.
SpaceCowboy is nu online   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 2 2019, 03:43 PM   #5062
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Had a spare hour this afternoon so figured it would be a good time to start tackling the snagging list on the Invacar.

The repainted engine cowl was reunited with the engine.



Being such a visible thing in the engine bay this immediately makes it look far less decrepit.

I then turned my attention to the slow puncture on the nearside rear wheel. This has lost roughly 5psi per day ever since the tyres were fitted. As such my suspicion was always that there was a leak from the rim rather than in the tyre itself.

Five minutes with the leak detector spray later, we have a winner.



Bubbling merrily from the bead right behind the larger balance weight. There's another smaller leak I spotted just after taking this photo just out of frame.

I've faffed around fitting tyres at home before and have deemed it to be considerably more trouble than it's worth (until such time as I inevitably pick up a tyre fitting machine) so decided to entrust sorting this to Formula 1 over in Newport Pagnell. My usual go-to for tyre stuff, only reason they didn't get the job of fitting these originally was that they literally wanted double the price for what were inferior tyres.

Suffice to say this being in the workshop caused a few scratched heads.





The gent who was working on the car for me couldn't have been more than 18 and was really enthusiastic which was nice to see.

Once the tyre was off it was obvious that no effort had been made to clean the rim up beforehand...bit disappointing given the tyres were fitted by a specialist not Kwik-Fit. Five minutes with the wire wheel had things looking far healthier, and we flipped the tyre around (they're not sided) to hide my horrible overspray. Was all going great...right up until this happened.



Gent doing the work was being careful and was doing everything by hand - that stud just decided it had had enough. They're happy to cover the cost of sourcing replacement and fitting no questions asked. So I'll have a dig later today (I still have the parts manual here waiting to be scanned because I'm so disorganised) to ascertain exactly what spec the studs are and will then get replacements ordered. Hopefully they're straight from the Mini as those will be plentifully and inexpensively available.

I'll plan on replacing all of them as a matter of course now. If one has failed without being abused in my time with the car there's no reason to believe the rest are in any better shape. I had one fail on a car before (can't recall which one) and the very next time I had the wheel off I recall a second stud snapping...so they're all getting done.

Once they're done they're done...one less thing to worry about.

Just hope access to the back of the hub isn't a problem.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 3 2019, 07:32 PM   #5063
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

We all knew this was not going to be simple didn't we!

So far I've ascertained that the Model 70 does NOT use Mini wheel studs. They're screw in ones rather than the splined knock-through type.

It became immediately apparent once I pulled the wheel off that my intention to change all the studs was sensible. Despite knowing they had never been overtightened or otherwise abused during my ownership, one additional to the one which snapped was bent (and cracked I discovered on closer examination).



Here's what came out. Going theory is that the thread is 3/8" UNF.







Anyone who recognises what they're out of I'd welcome your input.

The first three - including the snapped one - wound out nicely. Of course this was going too smoothly...the last one immediately stripped the moment I applied any torque to it.



Balls.

Picked up a tap and die set this afternoon in the hope I can possibly cut a smaller thread onto it and wind it out that way. I realise this is almost doomed to failure, and I'm going to wind up trying to weld a nut to it.

In slightly better news, a nice little improvement arrived today from Tipper's Classic & Vintage Plates.





Nicely retro reflective unlike the current ones which have become transparent!



Looking forward to getting these fitted to the car, they'll look so much better than the current scruffy, delaminated acrylic plates.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 3 2019, 11:42 PM   #5064
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

I think I've said this before, part of Murphy's Law says "Nothing is as easy as it looks" and "Everything takes longer than you think." Seems applicable in this situation.

That's why I prefer Cole's Law to Murphy's Law.
Cole's Law? "Finely shredded cabbage."
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4 2019, 10:16 AM   #5065
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

Post removed.


I think this was very suspicious; sorry if it isn't Allen.


If you think it was a valid link, then explain what it was.


It led me to a page that said: facebook is closed, click here. And I don't trust that kind of message at all.
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

Last edited by Hans; Sep 6 2019 at 11:45 AM. Reason: Suspicious
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4 2019, 04:17 PM   #5066
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Quote:
Originally Posted by Allen View Post
I think I've said this before, part of Murphy's Law says "Nothing is as easy as it looks" and "Everything takes longer than you think." Seems applicable in this situation.

That's why I prefer Cole's Law to Murphy's Law.
Cole's Law? "Finely shredded cabbage."
Congrats...you just made me inhale coffee.

A little closer examination of a slightly less mangled stud has me now pretty certain that we're looking at 3/8" UNF. That would be 9.52mm when it came fresh off the cutter...



A friend locally has a set of imperial thread gauges which should help us confirm the details when I get a chance to swing by their place. Once we've confirmed that sourcing replacement studs or bolts shouldn't be hard or expensive.

Another little accessory arrived for TPA today which I had honestly forgotten ordering.



Got to have a marque appropriate keyring...which reminds me that I really need to find a nice Mercedes one for the van sometime...
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 4 2019, 07:46 PM   #5067
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

Congratulation, Spacecowboy
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 5 2019, 04:34 AM   #5068
P'ter
Crafter

Craftmaster
 
P'ter's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Wolverhampton
Gender: M
Fan of: Favorite?
Now Reading: avidly
Default Re: What is happening

Talking about appropriate medallions etc: saw a guy on the train with an electric scooter. He was wearing a crash-helmet complete with dash-cams front and back; red neoprene gloves by Muddy-Fox; a large black leather jacket by Jaguar and a neoprene face-mask by Mercedes
__________________
"Truth is stranger than fiction: fiction has to make sense." Leo Rosten.

"When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."
C. S. Lewis

"I find television very educational. Whenever somebody switches it on I go in the other room and read a book." (attributed to Groucho Marx)

The Pedants are revolting! (against bad grammar)
P'ter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 7 2019, 07:35 PM   #5069
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

In a little bit of a change of pace I gave my Xantia a bit of attention recently. The poor thing deserves better, it gets far too forgotten about being used all the time.

One of the cosmetic issues it has faced since I picked it up was that the window seal was lifting at the rear edge of the front and front edge of the rear door on the offside. This looks unsightly at the best of times, and quite often you would find that someone walking past the car had snagged on it in a car park so you'd come back to this.



I seem to recall this being a really common issue even back when we were selling these cars at the garage 20 years ago. There should be a couple of little locating pegs in there, but they're long gone here.

My solution here was to gloop a bunch of Sikaflex behind the seal and clamp things in place...



...Then forgot about it for three or four days!

Once the clamps were removed things look far better.



Especially looking in the wing mirror where you used to be able to see it sticking out all the time.



The unexpected bonus of this has been a very noticeable reduction in wind noise at motorway speeds. Mostly though it just looks a hundred times better.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 8 2019, 06:25 PM   #5070
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Very quick evening update.

New number plates are now on the Invacar.





The ones which came with the car were truly wrecked.



The front one looks only scruffy at a glance...though the flash shows how awful a condition it too was in.



Just need to get some proper fasteners non the front one to tidy that up.

Small job in the grand scheme of things but it's nice to have it ticked off.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 10 2019, 06:43 PM   #5071
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

We've a friend staying with us this week due to poor health while their partner is away on an important business trip, so I'm in a situation where I'm a bit stuck really in that I can't go anywhere or really get involved in anything too in depth in case I'm needed to assist.

Still, there's no shortage of small things I can get done.

[] Van Headlight Reassembly.

Those of you who have known me for a while will be aware that the general field of lighting technology has been an interest of mine going back a couple of decades. There are no shortage of terrible and downright dangerous headlight "upgrade" kits out there, most of which seem to have the sole purpose of blinding as many oncoming drivers as possible. However when an LED "drop in H4 upgrade" popped up on Wish for £3 delivered, curiosity got the better of me and I ordered it. Not long after, a pair of these arrived on my doorstep.



Before I go any further it's worth mentioning that I am completely, fully aware that these are not legal for on road use in the UK. I have no intention of actually using them for general vehicle lighting - they have been bought out of pure scientific curiosity and a wish to see how terrible they actually are. The intention has always for once the testing was completed for them to most likely disappear into the endless pit of despair, otherwise known as the box of miscellaneous lighting technology in the loft.

I had to admit to being really rather surprised. Unlike the vast majority of HID conversions I've seen done over the years, the beam control here isn't actually bad. They've done a surprisingly good job of getting the LED arrays arranged to work well with the standard reflector.



It's worth noting that the nearside headlight is an aftermarket "Depo" branded replacement, and further investigation has shown that the beam from that is pretty poor even with a normal H4 lamp in, despite the headlight having only been fitted for a couple of months - so a proper Hella replacement is now on my wish list.

I did quite a bit of testing walking around in front of the van and asking my housemate to drive past me, and we both came to the conclusion that these headlights don't have any issues with regards to blinding oncoming traffic when they're fitted properly. It's important to note though that the lamps do fit into the collars which locate them in the headlights in four different orientations, so you need to make sure you're putting it in the right way up. I did note in the beam profile on the wall there does seem to be a bit of stray upward light above and beyond what you'd expect normally, but that didn't seem to actually translate into anything noticeable in the real world.

They seem to do a decent job of actually getting light on the road as well. Our streets around here are very well lit since the new LED streetlights were installed, so it's actually not that easy to see the spread of light on the road in front of you with the standard headlights in the van...these seem to do a better job there.



I don't actually think there is any more light hitting the ground from these lamps than the standard H4 ones, I think the light being a nice crisp pure white (I reckon around 5000K - it's a very clean white rather than strongly blue tinted) makes it seem brighter than it otherwise would.

I do reckon that one area (the legality obviously aside) these are going to fail though is longevity. To my eyes the provided heatsinking just isn't close to adequate for the intended application - especially sealed inside a headlight enclosure. The handbook which comes with these actually suggests leaving the back cover off...which is obviously a horrendous idea unless you really do want to destroy your reflectors in ten minutes flat. I'd love to be proven wrong there...and as I do still have the original nearside headlight from the van, I am tempted to stick one in there and set it running somewhere in a corner and just see how long the LED lamp takes to either go pop or to drop in brightness to the point that it can be considered to have failed. I just can't see these having a long life.

The other question for me was "are they an upgrade?" The simple answer there honestly, unless the ability to pick your colour temperature is critically important for your application...No. They don't actually give out any additional light it appears compared to a good quality H4 lamp provided your power supply is in good order.

As for are they terrible and dangerous? Not really...They're certainly a million times more friendly for other drivers than any aftermarket HID kit I've seen...Only real downside I can see possibly there relates to my concerns about longevity and they might fail on you after only a few hours...Though having said that as they're simply a drop in replacement...it's hardly the end of the world (assuming your car isn't one you need to remove the engine from to change a headlight bulb!) to resolve that situation by just sticking a new lamp in, and at least H4 bulbs haven't become too hard to find yet. From the perspective of another driver though, if the colour temperature of these was in the 2700-3500K range, you probably wouldn't be aware that they weren't conventional lamps...it's only the colour which gives it away externally.

Obviously though, they're completely illegal for road use over here, so these are destined for the box of "interesting but useless" lighting stuff. It does give me some hope though that we might some day see a retrofit provided by one of the big lighting companies which might offer a legal drop in H4 replacement. I'd always assumed it was impossible due to the difficulties in getting things to line up optically - but high power COB LEDs have advanced to the point now that it's getting pretty close to being doable now. Provided the output levels were limited to those provided by a conventional H4 lamp and the beam was correct...don't see any reason it couldn't have the relevant approval marks stamped on it. Though the cost of the approvals process for an ever shrinking market may well preclude it ever been deemed worthwhile by the manufacturers...I'll be curious to watch though.

I'm keeping my eyes open for similar H1/H7 retrofits appearing at similarly silly prices...and if/when that turns up I might need to do a similar experiment with the Xantia. Especially given it has headlamps which barely manage to scrape "adequate" as a description on a good day...

First task for today therefore was to return things to original. Despite this requiring removal of the radiator grill and the headlights themselves, this is a five minute job on the van because it's designed sensibly. While I was there though seemed a good time to clean up the offside headlight a bit. This is original to the van and was visibly quite internally grubby, and I was under the impression that the reflector was quite tarnished.

This can't have been helping anything...



Looking closer...





Conveniently as with most things on this vehicle, the headlights themselves are designed with service in mind, and as such the lens can be removed simply by removing four screws. With the lens off I was pleasantly surprised to see that the reflector was in a lot better condition than I was expecting.



Sure it's not perfect; there is a bit of clouding in general and the coating is flaking on the very top and bottom of the housing, but it's perfectly serviceable until such time as I track down a new headlight.

Five minutes scrubbing later had things looking much healthier.



Even more visible with the headlight turned on, it was really obviously cloudy before - and that indicated light that was being scattered and going places other than where it's designed to.



I really like this sort of image...It really does go to show how the reflector, lamp and diffractor design all work together to produce the desired beam profile.



There we go. Everything buttoned back up and tested. Beam alignment was checked just in case anything had moved, which it hadn't.



[] Dog Guard De-Bodging.

Some considerable time ago I needed to take the (then singular, now there are two of them) dog out on my own, so needed a way of keeping him where he belonged in the back of the van...This resulted in me grabbing a cheap and nasty dog guard that I'd discarded long ago from the scrap pile and wedging it in the space behind the seats. Ugly as sin, but it worked.



There were a few drawbacks though...Not least the fact that it rocked backwards and forwards every time you accelerated or braked, it rattled incessantly and made it a royal pain to try to get between the cab and living area. Today I decided to address a few of these issues. The dogs aren't going anywhere...so the dog guard needs to stay...and I'm not really likely to find a bespoke solution at a reasonable price that's going to fit a nearly 30 year old camper...so let's adapt what we've got.

A bit of thinking, a bit of realignment and a quick raid of the plumbing fittings box yielded the necessary hardware and we pretty quickly got things sorted out.



One of the main differences now is that there is a distinct "stowed" and "deployed" position for things.

Stowed, allowing relatively unhindered access between the front and rear of the van. You still need to step over it, but it's a much more sensible height.



Deployed, keeping any wandering dogs from straying into the cab. Not really too much of an issue these days as they know where they're meant to be, but it's nice to know.



No this wouldn't do a thing to keep some dogs in there - but ours are both largish and know where they're meant to be, so it's a visual deterrent as much as anything. We do hope that one day we might be able to employ harnesses, but that's still a ways off as they *really* don't like them...and trying to restrain a husky who doesn't want to be is an act in futility.

Both of the uprights need to have some rubber or similar caps fitted so I don't take my eye out the first time I fall over a dog, and I'll probably trim the one on the nearside down a bit. The offside one can stay at the current height though as it's where I usually have a stash of bags for shopping (which I remember maybe 1 time in 10 to actually take into the shop with me) and similar things left hanging.



Will be handy to help prevent the ongoing problem we have of pillows disappearing into the cab from the bed too, which I've found to be a recurring issue for me.

Haven't had a chance to actually go for a test drive yet, but there's no signs of buzzes or rattles at idle, which is a good start at least.

I'd like to switch to a sliding gate arrangement at some point, though I'm not sure if I'll ever get enough time to sufficiently engineer that...especially as it would need to be rattle free given my hate of all things which rattle! Haven't been able to go for a test run today, but it doesn't buzz due to the engine vibration at idle, so is already an improvement on the original arrangement. Obviously a coat of paint wouldn't go amiss either...

[] Continuation of the Invacar wheel stud saga.

You know some jobs are ones you just know are going to fight you every step of the way? Yes...this is definitely one of those.

I had decided that my first (in this episode!) line of attack to get the one remaining stud out was to tap a new thread on it and try backing it out the same way I did the others.

After a not insignificant amount of swearing due to poor access (due to the proximity of the central mounting flange on the hub which wanted to occupy the same space as my tap), I eventually got a new thread cut in the mangled remains of the stripped stud. Got a locknut fitted, got everything good and hot (it's been soaking in Plusgas for several days now) and...



Cue more swearing.

Scratching my head for ideas which didn't involve drilling the thing out as I don't rate my chances of managing that without damaging the threads, I grabbed the grinder and set about cutting flats into it in the hope that I might be able to get decent purchase on it with the Stilson's - no dice. The hub flange gets in the way of the head before I can get things to lock up to grab the stud...and things just keep sliding off.

I did notice that the two flats I'd cut into it weren't far off the right size to fit a 5/16" brake drum adjuster tool...so set about cutting a matching pair of flats into the remaining sides and put that on there (after applying even more heat). Result: One broken brake drum adjuster spanner.

Given the proximity of large amounts of fibreglass and the inability to move the car out of the garage in its current state I had really been hoping to avoid getting the welder involved...However I was out of better ideas by this point, so got it out, cleaned everything up and welded a nut onto the remains of the stud. Made a point of getting it as hot as I could before starting welding as I was thoroughly expecting the hub to behave as a massive heatsink and make it nigh on impossible to get a strong weld without melting the nut. My weld it turned out held just fine...the stud didn't, and snapped off yet closer to the face of the hub.

By this point I was quite royally hacked off with the thing so got distinctly medieval on it. I grabbed the nearest sized socket from the beat up cheap and nasty set, and hammered it on there with a 4lb lump hammer. I expected this to just slip off - nope. It just sheared the remains of the stud off almost completely flush with the hub.

Next best idea was to cut a reasonably deep slot in it and smack it with the impact driver. Unsurprisingly given that all indications suggested the stud was in fact made of cheese, it just mangled it the first smack of the hammer.

Grinder was busted back out again and the remains of the stud have been ground back flush with the face of the hub. I'll get a couple of new drill bits tomorrow and we'll just drill the sucker out. Have ordered an imperial tap & die kit in the thorough expectation that I'm probably going to need to sort the threads out afterwards...hopefully that forward planning will mean I don't need to!

I do find myself wondering at this point if this stud was ever actually made of an appropriate material from day one...so far this one seems to have behaved as though it's made of monkey metal!

Investigation has revealed that the other wheel nut holes in the hubs have M12x1.5 threads in them. These however only go in approximately 10mm, the thread doesn't run all the way through - even though the hole does go all the way through the hub. So wheel bolt length must have been critical in the original application. The PCD does look to be smaller than the one used by the wheels on there, albeit by the tiniest of amounts, it's barely visible lining the spacer ring which usually sits between the brake drum and the wheel up with the holes.

Stay tuned to find out how this probably goes even more spectacularly wrong and I continue to make an utter meal of what should be a dead simple job!

Last edited by Zelandeth; Sep 11 2019 at 02:33 AM. Reason: typo
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 11 2019, 03:51 PM   #5072
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Being stuck dealing with gardening most of the day again today I was only left with an hour or so to do anything car related.

I decided to investigate something which had been mentioned yesterday on another forum as to whether it might be possible in the absence of a plentiful supply of RHD Merc T1 headlights at sensible prices, to adapt an LHD one. While I know that's not really an easy option as you'd need to both swap over the lens and modify the lamp holder, it set an idea rolling in my head. Most notably that I was pretty sure that the somewhat poor beam image I had from my nearside aftermarket headlight was most likely down to the lens rather than anything else...and I still had a good original lens, it was the reflector that was stuffed and resulted in the headlight being changed. Could I improve things by swapping the OEM lens across to the aftermarket unit?

A quick rummage revealed that the old headlight was indeed still in the scrap pile. Was a bit buried but didn't take too long to unearth.



Pulling the lens off did indeed confirm my original assumption that a replacement had been bought by the previous owner because the reflector was knackered...I've seen worse and it could be refurbished, but it's definitely past its best. Pretty colours though...

Note that this still has the R2-H4 upgrade lamp in it. That's since been retrieved and stored safely as it's the same as is currently still used in the O/S light on the van.

When I got the van this headlight had the bung the wiring loom passes through in the back cover dislodged, so I suspect that there has been historically an issue with water ingress due to that which has lead to this one being in a far worse condition than the offside one (still in service).



Ten minutes scrubbing with some warm soapy water followed by some glass cleaner had the lens looking like new. Testament to how tough glass really is I suppose.



Comparing the OEM Hella lens and the one from the aftermarket Depo headlight next to each other, there is quite a clear difference between the two in that the details in the Hella lens are far more sharply defined, in comparison the Depo one looks very "soft" for want of a better term. You obviously can't tell in the photos, but the Hella lens is nearly twice the weight of the Depo one too. Similar story with the seals, the Hella one is a properly contoured item which fits into a groove in the housing, whereas the Depo one just uses a (not particularly well fitted) bit of square foam. They had also put the join in that seal at the top rather than the bottom of the headlight...that's just asking for future water ingress issues.



With the Hella lens in place, the headlights now visually matching each other pleases my OCD tendencies. No it's not something that anyone else would ever notice...but I *knew* they were different...



Quick test (after a quick beam adjustment) shows a far improved beam that far closer matches the offside one. Given they're running two different lamps (offside is a Halfords own brand R2-H4 upgrade, nearside is a somewhat ancient Osram H4 I dug out of my spares stash) I'd still expect there to be a little difference between the two anyway.



Looking at the beam image with the camera you can see how much better defined it is too.



This image obviously is flipped the other way up by the time it gets to the road due to the wonders of optics (the downward kink to the left of the image is what actually forms the kick up to the left of the beam on the road).

Quite happy with that result, having made one good headlight out of one knackered old one and one distinctly mediocre modern one...So hats off to the gent on the other forum who mentioned the thought which set this idea in motion.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 13 2019, 08:26 PM   #5073
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Today has been a bit of a disaster...eventually decided I'd had enough of dealing with the outside world and retreated to the garage.

Been a while since I've done any real cleaning/valet type stuff and it's something I used to enjoy (was my Saturday job for five years)...van has no shortage of targets.

The run marks here by the high level tail lights are impervious to normal washing materials, TFR and so far elbow grease.



A combination of cutting compound and the power polisher were applied.



Definitely a huge improvement. Nearside was precisely as grubby. The whole van is entirely matt too, so gave the rear panel a bit of a going over in general to see if it was interested in taking a shine...



Of course we had to encounter the obligatory "first time I've ever used this polisher and cutting compound" moment where I cut through the paint. Oops.

The rear bumper had a lot of marks on it from where someone had taped something to it. Glad to report that the polisher made short work of that.



The horribly messily applied sealant will be dealt with in due course...did scrape a fair bit of it off after taking that photo as well.

Whole van really needs going over...but it will obviously come up okay. The roof really wants a good scrub too...if I can figure out how to get to the middle of it without falling *through* the roof...going to take forever though - it's at times like this that you realise how much bigger this is than your typical car.

The cab will come up okay too it seems...



I need to stop procrastinating about it and just buy a new bonnet. The vinyl graphics are basically holding the offside corner together. Yes it's £150 (at a guess £300 delivered, painted and with the graphics remade) but hopefully shouldn't need to be touched again... especially as I'll obviously rustproof the snot out of it before fitting. If going down that road I should probably just do the apron at the same time... imagine that would do a massive amount towards tidying it up though... likewise trying to sort the ridiculous panel gaps...the bonnet was obviously refitted by a blind monkey at some point...

The thought occurs as well that if I painted the whole windscreen scuttle with the same colour of white it would help make the rust look rather less obvious...
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 14 2019, 08:27 PM   #5074
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

I don't think I will ever complain that reviving weathered paint on a car is tedious and time consuming ever again. Reckon we're about 1/3 done now

Back is looking almost presentable now.





The rear window was covered in a lot of very fine scratches before which gave it a cloudy appearance. Glad to report that it revived to an as new finish without any headaches.



Calling the back done for now. This isn't a final job, I'm just wanting to get to a presentable finish...need to get the spare wheel off and the tall ladder out to properly reach the top and the middle of the bumper.

Definitely need to get all the beading off here and re-seal under it. I'm just going to work on the assumption that they all need doing as that way I'm far more likely to have a water tight van afterwards. Especially as bathroom sealer seems to have been the material of choice for the most recent round of repairs by the previous previous keeper.

Speaking of the roof...yeah... it's been a few years since this was clean.



That front roof light will be getting changed soon. That one does leak very slightly under really heavy rain... probably just needs a new head of sealant around it, but as the frame inside is cracked in a couple of places it just makes sense to change it I reckon. Sadly I suspect finding one in anything other than white seems unlikely these days...

Moving on to the offside...yep, it was as bad as everywhere else.



You should be able to see my reflection here...



Yep...can definitely see where I got to!







This was probably a couple of hours work - albeit feeling like far more because I kept getting interrupted.

Once this is done the next step will be to basically drown the thing in wax to protect the paint as best as I can.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 15 2019, 11:22 AM   #5075
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

You're learning. Stuff I learned about 40 or 50 years ago. Main thing is, use as mild a compound as you can to get rid of the oxidation, especially on the ridges, again, as you found out. A lot of times, especially with a power buffer, you're better off with a good name liquid polish (not wax; the difference is wax has no grit). It will be a bit slower because it's not as aggressive, but less chance of burning through. Three things: Keep the buffer moving, keep the bonnet clean, and keep the buffer moving. Did I mention, keep the buffer moving?
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 15 2019, 06:35 PM   #5076
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Biggest thing that's caught me out here is that the mop on this has very little padding on it. The one I used to use back in my days at the garage had a much thicker pad on the back so it didn't pick up on edges half as much. I'll probably do the rest of the ridged/dimpled sections by hand to eliminate the risk. Though the blue dimpled bits are a pain.

Shame it's not easier to get them off...or I'd respray *and clearcoat them* so they didn't fade so badly in future. However they're integral to the skin so ain't going anywhere.

The paint is quite thin on the camper section too - on the plus it's aluminium so no corrosion issues in the interim. Cab paintwork is actually much more substantial so less likely to rub through if my concentration wavers for a millisecond!

It's surprisingly hard to keep the polisher moving properly when doing the camper as there are just so many things in the way!

Definitely need to hit the bonnet and roof on the Citroen with the same kit - it's got a lot of swirl marks on it and is really dull compared to the rest of the car (well, aside from where the clearcoat has vanished anyway), so be curious to see if I can improve that. At least that's a modern paint finish so should be a little less fragile.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 15 2019, 07:57 PM   #5077
mawra
Dolphin Friend

Craftmaster
 
mawra's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: CONCORD VA
Gender: F
Fan of: PERN
Now Reading: Dolphins of Pern and Queens ow
Default Re: What is happening

Foot is much better, not 100%. Dr. said it will take a long time healing, because of where it was at.

Just celebrated 26 years of being married. Not sure how I found someone to put up with me for that long.
__________________
MEDDLE NOT IN THE AFAIRS OF DRAGONS, FOR YOU ARE CRUNCHY & GOOD WITH CHOCOLATE


SO MANY BOOKS SO LITTLE TIME


DRIVING SMART KEEPS YOU ALIVE
mawra is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 16 2019, 11:29 AM   #5078
Allen
Senior Member
 
Allen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Last house on the left, across from the cemetery
Gender: M
Fan of: The Pern Series
Now Reading: Robin Hobb's Shaman's Crossing
Default Re: What is happening

Quote:
Originally Posted by mawra View Post
Just celebrated 26 years of being married. Not sure how I found someone to put up with me for that long.
He's probably wondering not only why you chose him in the first place, but why on earth you ever stuck it out this long. LOL! Happy anniversary.
__________________
All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.
Allen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 21 2019, 12:59 PM   #5079
Hans
Master Archivist
 
Hans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: The Netherlands
Gender: M
Fan of: Pern!
Default Re: What is happening

Quote:
Originally Posted by mawra View Post
Foot is much better, not 100%. Dr. said it will take a long time healing, because of where it was at.

Just celebrated 26 years of being married. Not sure how I found someone to put up with me for that long.

Congratulations on your anniversary Michelle, and on your foot. Glad to hear it's healing. Keep it easy and give it the time and chance to heal! My wife and I celebrated 40 years of marriage last May
__________________
Hans, also known as Elrhan, Master Archivist

Visit The Pern Museum & Archives for all your Pern and Anne McCaffrey News and Resources!
The Pern Museum & Archives is the home of the Pern Encyclopedia and the Pern Bloodlines.
Hans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 21 2019, 09:23 PM   #5080
Zelandeth
Senior Member
 
Zelandeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Milton Keynes
Gender: M
Fan of: Dragonsdawn
Now Reading: Working my way through the whole Pern series
Default Re: What is happening

Congratulations on the anniversary! Seven years for us next year.

About time the Citroen was given some proper attention. She's used pretty much daily and really hasn't needed anything of note beyond regular servicing since I got it at the end of 2016. Not bad for a 26 year old 135K mile car which the majority of people consider to be fragile and overcomplicated. A credit both to Citroen themselves and the care with which the previous owner looked after the car.

Over the last month or so I've started to notice an odd symptom through the steering of the car tending to want to wander under hard acceleration, tending to pull more to the right. From the driver's seat it feels very much like torque steer.

One thing I was aware of was that this had become noticeable right about the point that the front tyres really started to get to the "these need changing" state, so wanted to check whether swapping them around would have any impact on the behaviour. She will be getting four new tyres shortly anyway due to old age which is why I never bothered swapping them a while ago to balance the wear. The rears still have plenty of tread left, but they're shot...



Uniroyal RainExpert (3 I think is the current version) will replace these shortly.

While I had the wheels off I noticed something. A while ago our local council made the genius decision to resurface some of the roads around here, basically drowning the road in tar then throwing some gravel at it. Given the ambient temperatures at the time, the road needed to be closed until it had at least mostly set. As it was they'd just scattered some travel over it, shrugged and wandered off...no signage or anything. The first any poor drivers knew of it was when they suddenly found themselves sliding through gravelly treacle. I wound up with tar and gravel stuck all over the car, including the roof. I need to try to shift this chunk at some point...



That's not just gravel... it's a solid lump of tar and gravel. Couple of new stainless steel clips on the fuel tank filler neck wouldn't go amiss either.

Up front there was nothing obviously amiss aside from spotting a small split in the nearside CV boot. Good opportunity to show off the bits which make the Activa special though.



The important bit is the smaller hydraulic ram connected between the anti-roll-bar and the bottom of the main suspension strut. It's by pushing or pulling on this ram and an identical one at the opposite corner connected to the rear suspension that the car is able to keep itself level during cornering.

Don't worry about the handbrake cable looking tight there. It is slightly on the tight side with the suspension set to the service high position (which you only use when checking the LHM level and when jacking the car up), but it's perfectly fine with the suspension at the normal running height.

While it would have been nice if the problem was entirely down to knackered tyres I knew it was a long shot. Sure enough there is absolutely zero difference apparent from the driver's seat. Having spoken to a few people who know these cars inside out it sounds like the most likely candidates for the symptoms I've got are are worn front control arm bushes. These are quite a faff to change on the Activa so the work will be farmed out to a specialist. There's probably a couple of other bushes etc which will want changing by this age and mileage so I'll probably be giving them an instruction to just sort anything they see that's amiss. May as well do it while everything is already in bits as that's where 85% of the labour charges will be incurred so it will actually save me money in the long run. MOT is up in December too, and having the car turn up with a bunch of new parts fitted always gives a good impression I think.
Zelandeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

A Meeting of Minds forum owned by Cheryl B. Miller.
All references to worlds and characters based on Anne McCaffrey’s fiction are copyright © Anne McCaffrey 1967-2008, all rights reserved, and used by permission of the author.